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ment, dear to every true American heart,--Liberty and Union, now and forever, one and inseparable!"

While Secretary of State, under Presidents Harrison and Tyler, he succeeded in settling the difficult and vexed question of the North Eastern Boundary, which bad been the subject of negotiation between the United States and England, almost ever since the Peace of 1783. The attitude which the two nations had assumed towards each other in relation to the disputed territory, was of the most alarming character. Adverse and hostile forces had actually assembled on the northeastern boundary; and if prompt and efficient measures had not been devised by Mr. WEBSTER, to avoid an open collision between the troops, without compromiting the honor of either country, a war with England would have been inevitable. His diplomatic intercourse with foreign governments was frank, open and honorable: be considered the dissimulation, stratagems and trickery of hackneyed diplomatists, as unworthy a great people. No Statesman was ever more successful in carrying on our foreign relations than Mr. WEBSTER.

With the commencement of President Polk's administration, Mr. WEBSTER returned to the Senate of the United States. Though unconnected with the Executive branch of the Government, the fact is well established, that he exercised a controlling influence with the British Ministry in the settlement of the Oregon question in 1846.

The acquisition of California gave rise, as we all remember, to the discussion of the Slavery question, which agitated the public mind to such an alarming extent, that serious apprehensions were entertained that it might eventually lead to a dissolution of the Union. At this crisis, the Great Pacificator, HENRY CLAY, (whose death, alas! we also mourn,) stepped forward, and introduced those Compromise measures, which it is to be hoped, have removed that exasperating topic of dissension and ill feeling forever. The happy effects which have flowed from that wise and seasonable legislation, have silenced all opposition to it except by a set of deluded fanatics, who are addressed in vain by the voice of reason, and who are ready to sacrifice all the blessings we enjoy individually and as a nation, to gratify their frantic rage, and execute their reckless determination to do mischief. But when the Compromise was first proposed, it met with


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