103

DANIEL WEBSTER.

his nomination had been defeated, with kindness and respect. He was full of the milk of human kindness. Wherever he discovered worth and talent, he was ready to do them homage and give them encouragement.

His personal appearance, especially when he rose to address the Senate, was remarkably imposing. He was a perfect personification of Milton's conception of a great Statesman and Orator:

* * * * * * * * * "With grave
Aspect he rose, and in his rising seemed
A pillar of State; deep on his front engraven
Deliberation sat, and public care.
* * * * * * * * * Sage he stood
With Atlantean shoulders fil fit to bear
The weight of mightiest commonwealths; his look
Drew audience and attention still as night,
On summer's noontide air."

His is not the impetuous, vehement, stormy eloquence of CLAY, nor the fervid, didatic, powerful ratiocination of CALHOUN. His oratory is not like the mountain torrent, dashing on in its fury over rocks and cataracts; but rather like a mighty river, flowing on majestically in its deep channel, carrying every obstacle before it without any apparent struggle. All his oratorical efforts are distinguished by a comprehensive, deep and accurate analysis of principles, and a close, irresistible logic. Though gifted with a rich fancy and an exuberant imagination, yet he kept these potent auxiliaries of eloquence always in strict subordination to his analitical and logical powers, and only called in their assistance to illustrate and give effect to his argument. A mere flight of the imagination, for the purpose of embellishment alone, is not to be found in the whole range of Mr. WEBSTER's speeches. He disdains the glare and tinsel of the rhetorician; but the wonderful charm of his oratory consists in the force, originality and correctness of his thoughts. He carefully avoids the fatal mistake of confounding pomposity of diction with genuine eloquence. His narration is simple, unaffected and perspicuous. He rises with the importance and dignity of the theme he is discussing. When expatiating on, and developing the great principles of our own peculiar American Liberty, both his heart and his genius seem to luxuriate in their proper element. More quotations from his speeches have been made in this discourse than

Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104