15

FUNERAL CEREMONIES

On motion of Alderman Lugenbuhl, the chair appointed a sub-committee of eight, to prepare a programme, and report to the General Committee at a future day.

The chair appointed the following gentlemen: Aldermen Lugenbuhl and Harris, on the part of the Board of Aldermen; Aldermen Place and Watkins, on the part of the Board of Assistants; Messrs. Holbrook and Cushing, on the part of the citizens; and Messrs. Cohen and Elmore, on the part of the bar. On motion, the Chairman, Col. Hill, was added to the committee.

From the first, the revered names Of CALHOUN, CLAY and WEBSTER, had been so spontaneously united in the thoughts and regrets of every one, and the expression of sorrow for their loss, and admiration for their characters and services occurred so constantly and prominently in all the meetings that had taken place, that it was no matter of astonishment or opposition when the Sub-Committee, at their first meeting, resolved to report in favor of a solemn funeral ceremony in honor, not of WEBSTER alone, but of his great compeers, CALHOUN and CLAY, with him. The idea met with universal approbation, and the more so that there was a general consciousness that the city had not acted with a due regard to its own dignity in passing over without municipal notice and ceremony, the deaths of such illustrious Americans, patriots, statesmen and orators, as JOHN C. CALHOUN and HENRY CLAY. There had long been a desire to repair this apparent neglect, and the opportunity to do so now offered, was eagerly seized upon. Besides, it struck the general mind, that a ceremony uniting the feelings entertained by the entire community towards the departed Triumvirate, would be impressed with a more imposing solemnity, commensurate with the history of the deceased as a trio in the nation's councils, than a funeral display designed to honor the memory of only one of them. The latter would be sectional; the former, national.

The Sub-Committee went actively to work with the design of preparing for this general ceremonial. At the next meeting of the General Committee, which took place on Thursday evening, November 11th, they offered through Mr. Lugenbuhl, a series of resolutions defining the plan they had adopted. A funeral procession was of course to be the main feature of the occasion. The day was fixed for

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