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HISTORY OF THE

Thursday, the 9th December, opened with a cloud dispelling breeze from the north that cleared up the skies, brightened the appearance of the city, gave a bracing tinge to the air, and materially assisted in drying the streets which had been deluged by rain during the night. At an early hour, on all sides, the evidences were plentiful of the general determination to solemnize the day in the most appropriate manner. Row after row of windows and balconies, and house and store fronts, for miles in extent--from north to south, and east to west--speedily displayed the sable and white insignia of mourning, arranged according to the dictates of thousands of fancies and tastes, some in the simplest folds, some on a small plan, some on grand dimensions, some with an elaborateness of design in which velvet, silk, crape, linen, drawn in arches, columns, broad bands, rosettes, mingled harmoniously with wreaths, banners, altars, urns, and statuary, formed tableaux most striking and beautiful. The inscriptions of the names of the dead Statesmen were by scores. These, and their veiled busts and portraits, exhibited in windows and doors, or on balconies, spoke eloquently and impressively of the great deeds and words of the departed, recalling continually to the passing multitudes sayings or services which bad become household words with the American people--which the school-boy declaimed, the youth thrilled to hear, the man burned to equal, the woman delighted to admire, and the whole United States treasured up as precious examples of unsurpassed wisdom, courage, eloquence and patriotism.

These many present memorials of the great dead, meeting the eye in every direction, though at first attracting the gaze of curiosity, immediately afterwards presented the sad, the solemn thought that it was not to celebrate another triumph of the burning genius, lofty devotion, or far stretching wisdom of these three men, that the city had put on her flaunting robes; no--a mightier than they--whose voice though unheard, and form though unseen, thrilled the hearts and awed the minds of men with a power more terrible and irresistible than any human voice or form could do, had conquered the unconquerable, and it was Death's gloomy, chilling triumph the mighty city was now to celebrate, despite itself, with frowning reluctance and heavy heart.


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