33

FUNERAL CEREMONIES

Next appeared that fine old corps, the Louisiana Legion, composed principally of citizens of foreign birth, or, when native born, of foreign descent. They numbered in their ranks many veterans of well fought fields in both continents, and therefore are regarded by the old residents of New Orleans with a peculiar interest.

Gen. Augustin, commanding the Brigade, aided by a numerous staff, headed the Legion, the march of which was opened by the Pioneers in huge bearskin shakos, and armed with formidable axes. Two large and excellent field bands accompanied the Legion. Behind the Pioneers, marched that corps d'elite, the Battalion of Artillery, which numbered over 100 men. Behind them came the time-worn colors of the Legion, properly escorted, and followed by the Spanish, Swiss, French and German Companies, under the command of Lieut. Col. Eichols. The Legion numbered in all 232 muskets, and was followed by two batteries of three brass guns and caissons each, drawn by two horses each, and escorted by twelve mounted artillerymen. These pieces belonged to the Battalion of Artillery. The gallant old officer, Major Gally, who had so long commanded the Battalion, followed the guns in an open barouche, illness preventing him from attending otherwise.

Last came the U. S. Troops, under Bvt. Lieut. Col. Nauman. Their trim and soldierly, yet modest appearance, were the objects of continual praise and notice. Their other officers were Capt. J. B. Picketts, First Artillery, commanding; First Lieut. J. B. Fry, and Second Lieut. H. E. Maynadier.

Major General Lewis, with a numerous and brilliant staff, closed the First Division.

The Second Grand Division was opened by a band of music, followed by two carriages in which rode the officiating Clergymen and Orators of the Day.

The Funeral Car came next. It was the principal feature of the Procession, and an examination of it showed that it had been prepared by careful and tasteful hands. To Mr. Dubuque is due the credit of its design and execution. It measured eleven feet in length by sixteen in height, and about eight in breadth. The bed or platform

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