42
EULOGY ON

public tranquility. Although no more than the relations of other public men existed between him and the people of this State, his loss was deplored as of a benefactor in intimate connection with them.

But it was in his native State that his memory received its well merited homage. The deep veneration, the silent but heartfelt grief, manifested by all classes--bond as well as free--bore testimony to his private as well as his public worth. Nor was this a mere ebullition of feeling on the occasion which passed away with the pageant of his obsequies. For months after his interment his grave was strewn with flowers by the bands of affection--a beautiful homage of the female heart to purity and genius. The generous emotions called forth by his death, were the consequences of his character as a man, a neighbor, and a friend. Mere public services would not have caused them; but with him the private virtues were admirably blended with the highest intellectual endowments, and were as vivid and as actively employed among those about him, as if he had been confined to the circle of domestic life. In estimating the character of Mr. CALHOUN, We must consider his private virtues as one of the main elements of his greatness, and of the great influence over his fellow men, which he possessed to a remarkable extent.

He was born in 1782, in Abbeville District, South Carolina, at the settlement which still bears the name of his family, in the midst of the tumults of the Revolutionary War. The early impressions of his childhood were necessarily associated with its traditions and events, and created in him those strong characteristics which marked his after life. Brought up in the midst of a people in a measure isolated, in whom truth, independence, and manliness were the prominent virtues, and whom the artificial modes of society had not even reached, still less contaminated, a sense of duty became his paramount thought. The want of academic instruction was more than supplied by parental care. His early education was in the sanctuary of his family. The strong intelligence of the father, the watchfulness and affection of the mother, directed and sustained the youthful mind in the way of knowledge and the paths of right and truth, from which surrounding associations offered no temptation to deviate. He thus had the best basis for his future intellectual cultiva-


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