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JOHN C. CALHOUN.

their memory. With them are associated the names of the illustrious patriots, who by their indomitable spirit and steadfastness, maintained the cause of their country amidst the vicissitudes of war, and in the darkest moments of defeat and disaster.

An occasion like this, as was natural, brought together in the public counsel, men of the greatest talent and distinction; and it is no disparagement to the fame of any one of them, to say that Mr. CALHOUN was in all respects his equal. Nor were the honors of those days easily won. The opposition throughout the administration of Mr. Madison was conducted by men of the highest character, influence, and ability. Many of them had established their reputations as public men, and possessed great weight with the country-men with whom it was honorable to compete in so noble a cause. Amidst all the differences, and collisions of opinion, it was the peculiar good fortune of Mr. CALHOUN, that while he supported with zeal and firmness his own convictions of policy, he at the same time secured the good will and respect of his distinguished opponents, who on frequent occasions bore testimony to his great talents and worth.

The close of the war found him one of the foremost men of the nation. Perhaps in the whole course of our history there is no man who at his time of life had earned to himself so elevated a position. Already he had won the confidence and esteem of his fellow citizens, and established his fame as an orator and statesman. Attracted by his urbanity of manners and the fascination of his varied intellectual powers, all sought his society, and none came from it without the impression of his greatness. Nor did his success disturb in any respect the habits of his life, or induce any relaxation from his laborious application to intellectual pursuits. His mind was constantly employed upon those great topics of political science which were his favorite studies, and which occupied his leisure during life.

In 1817 commenced the administration of James Monroe, the successor of the enlightened and virtuous Madison. Mr. CALHOUN received from him the appointment of Secretary of War, and continued at the bead of that department until the close of his second administration in 1825. The duties of that office were not at that period a mere administrative routine. On the contrary, the late war had

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