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EULOGY ON

accumulated a mass of unfinished business in the department. Its difficulties were increased by the want of a proper system of expenditure and accountability. This had not been felt with a small army in time of peace, but necessarily produced great embarrassments during the operations of war, and confusion at its close. Under ordinary circumstances an office like this offered little inducement to a man in the position of Mr. CALHOUN. The exchange from his career of triumph in the House of Representatives to the details and drudgery of an administrative office could present no attractions to a man of his temperament. There is generally among men of his class a fondness for the pursuits in which they excel, and an aversion to those of an opposite character. They leave with regret the theatre in which they address and hold intercourse with a people and receive its applause, for the fastidious and irksome labors of a place in which their voice is not heard, and their exertions are unknown or unappreciated. It was sufficient however that this branch of the government most needed reformation to secure to the country the benefit of his services.

During the quiet and prosperous administration of Mr. Monroe, the War Department under his charge was reorganized, and the present admirable system introduced and carried into effect. It is no small praise to his skill and ability that they commanded the confidence of military men, and that his administration of the War Department is an epoch in the history of our military establishment. In considering the recent achievements of our army--the fortunate results of courage, skill, and the complete organization of every branch of the service, we ought not to overlook the intelligence which first gave the direction and established the organization from which so much has inured to the honor of our arms and the strength of our republic. In taking charge of the War Department Mr. CALHOUN was thrown entirely upon his own judgment and responsibility. The greatest confusion prevailed in all branches of the department. Nearly fifty millions of accounts remained outstanding and unadjusted. After reducing them to a few millions, and introducing order and accountability in every part of the service, and bringing down the annual expenditure of the army to four millions and a half, without taking a single comfort from officer or soldier, he left the department in a con-


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