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JOHN C. CALHOUN.

plained the invaluable advantages of the plan to be substituted for this unnatural and disastrous alliance.

Public opinion on this subject was completely revolutionized, and the measures and views of financial policy then entertained, are now looked back upon with wonder--as the delusions of the clay. Mr. CALHOUN's views of policy relating to the financial and other material interests of the country appear to comprehend the great changes which its condition has since undergone with the increase of territory, wealth, population, and its progress in the arts, and to be in accordance with the exigencies of these combined elements. These views were presented in debate with masterly force of argument and illustration.

The Ashburton treaty which terminated the vexed and long pending controversy on the subject of the North Eastern boundary, received his cordial support; and on that occasion, in stating his reasons for his vote he exhibited in their strongest light his moderation, his accurate acquaintance with the subjects embraced in the treaty, and his patriotic and elevated purposes. He did not insist upon his views on several points, and voted for the treaty as a measure of conciliation, and as the first step towards a durable good understanding and peace. On all the important subjects before the Senate Mr. CALHOUN took a leading part in the debate. The Bankrupt Law, the Public Lands, the Veto-power engaged his attention and called forth his best exertions, as well as those topics directly connected with the financial and general policy of the country.

After a short retirement from the Senate, he was, with the unequivocal approbation of the Nation, appointed to the office of Secretary of State. With reluctance he accepted the appointment, which had been unanimously confirmed by the Senate without the usual forms observed by that body. The condition of our foreign affairs required the services of a statesman of great experience and weight of character, and Mr. CALHOUN carried to the office the confidence of all. The subject of the annexation of Texas was then pressing upon public attention, and the time had come when it was necessary for the Government to act definitively upon this important question. The difficulties which it presented were met promptly by Mr. CALHOUN, who gave such a direction to the negotiation that Texas became one

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