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JOHN C. CALHOUN.

the Union among the enlightened, the virtuous, and the patriotic of all parties. This support, though not manifested on all occasions, rested upon strong and deliberate views of both duty and interest, and a sincere attachment to our institutions. What had been prophecy in 1836 on the part of CALHOUN, became fact in 1849. The organized incendiary movement for the overthrow of the fundamental law of tile Union, with its orators, preachers and presses, had accomplished its great purpose on its way to distinction. It acquired a foothold in Congress under the insidious mask of the right of petition--a right dear to those whose ancestors had fought the battle of civil and religious liberty in Europe. All indiscriminate and undue respect for that right had led to abuses of the most scandalous and disreputable character, and resulted in open attacks on the integrity of the Constitution itself. At the outset the movement seemed to be confined to well meaning persons who were, or thought they were under the influence of religious impulses. In England all administration for the purpose of obtaining the votes of a sect, and thereby maintaining its ascendancy, had spread desolation over their colonies in the West Indies, by the abolition of domestic servitude. Notwithstanding the political independence which the United States attained by the Revolution, a social dependence to a certain extent still exists on our part. Literature, the arts, commerce, and a common language, combine in keeping up the dependence, and to impose on us not only the convential and social, but also the religious conceits which break out in the midst of that artificial state of society. The excitement on the subject of Slavery, which in its origin was confined to a few, and was therefore harmless, soon became too powerful an element not to be turned to account, and its progress exhibits one of the most marked examples of ignorance and profligate demagogueism which the history of civilization can present. It was fostered in order to be used in the contests of numbers, and became formidable when men of note availed themselves of it as the means of their success. Many fanned the kindling flame, who have recoiled from the consequent conflagration. Had the feeling been met at the commencement with the energy and independence since displayed in resisting it, it would have been kept within its circle among that class of opinions which it is better for society to

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