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EULOGY ON

Our CALHOUN, our CLAY, and our WEBSTER are no more. They are all gone. One by one, they have passed from the great theatre of their glory and renown. The places which once knew them, will know them no more forever. Almost three years have rolled away since the Nation was called to deplore the loss of her CALHOUN. Months have elapsed since she followed the remains of her CLAY to the chosen spot of his final repose. The voice of Philosophy had whispered peace to her troubled spirit, and the tumultuous agitations of grief had been succeeded by the holy calm of resignation to the irresistible decrees of the Omnific Word; but her great heart is again pierced by the dart of affliction, and her voice of lamentation, giving utterance alike to her past and present grief, is once more beard over the lifeless form of her WEBSTER. Like the fond mother who has surrendered one by one all her loved and cherished sons to the cold embraces of the grave, who recalls over her last departed the virtues that adorned them all, and beholds again in imagination their noble forms, as when side by side they watched over and protected her with the same filial devotion; she yields her bleeding heart to that agony of suffering which no hope can assuage, no philosophy can soothe, and pours forth her accumulated sorrows over their common tomb.

And now, fellow-citizens, while the venerated names Of CALHOUN and WEBSTER are, upon other tongues,--the themes of eulogy and praise--it becomes my pleasing duty to present to your grateful contemplation a brief review of the life, character and services of HENRY CLAY.

Brief, indeed, must be the review of such a life, of such a character, and of such services, to be comprehended within the limits of this occasion. A life from early manhood devoted to the promotion of the happiness, prosperity and glory of his country; a character whose unsullied purity, moral elevation and Olympic grandeur, have become the bright exemplars of the future statesman; and services, which in their momentous effects and consequences are to be felt upon the destinies of this Republic through all time, might well be regarded as appropriate subjects to be left to emblazon the tomes of the future historian. It is not, however, for the purpose of imparting knowledge upon topics, of which as Americans you can never be presumed to be


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