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HENRY CLAY.

ignorant, that in a passing tribute to the memory of the illustrious dead, we advert to the shining qualities that adorned his character, or glance at the prominent part he performed in the grand drama of public life. We seek rather, by reviving a recollection of the past, to awaken the mind to a full and solemn sense of the nature and extent of the national bereavement, and by recurring to the glorious examples that have gone before us, to enable us the better to appreciate the importance of the obligations we are called upon to discharge. As successors to the rich inheritance of constitutional liberty and republican glory bequeathed to us by the good and the great who have gone down to their graves, we cannot hope to preserve that inheritance and transmit it unimpaired to posterity, if we cease to venerate the characters, refuse to emulate the examples, or fail to observe the precepts of those from whom we have received it.

We cannot reflect upon the solemn and heartfelt manifestations of public grief which immediately followed the death of Mr. CLAY, without feeling that his highest, his noblest eulogy is the sorrow exhibited by his countrymen on the melancholy occasion. We all felt that the long lingering illness of the venerable patriot had gradually prepared us to listen with calm and christian resignation to the intelligence of his final dissolution. And yet, when on the wings of the lightning that intelligence was conveyed to the remotest parts of the Republic, we well remember how that Republic from its centre to its extremities was convulsed by the shock produced by the sudden assurance that the great Statesman was no more. The whole Nation seemed bowed down with a sense of its irreparable loss, and clothed itself with the habiliments of mourning; and the people joined with one accord in rendering funeral honors to the mighty dead. In every city, town and village through which his mortal remains were borne on their way to their final resting place, the mourning thousands assembled to testify their affectionate regards for his memory. Sorrow was depicted upon every countenance, and all eyes were turned to behold the bier that contained the last of him, who but a few months before, with form erect and eagle eye, bad moved in the midst of his admiring countrymen, the object of their gratitude and love. The swelling tones of organs pealing among clustered columns, and along

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