A HISTORY
OF THE PROCEEDINGS IN THE CITY OF NEW ORLEANS, ON THE OCCASION OF THE FUNERAL CEREMONIES IN HONOR OF CALHOUN, CLAY AND WEBSTER, WHICH TOOK PLACE ON THURSDAY, DECEMBER 9th 1852.

The intelligence of the death of DANIEL WEBSTER was first made known in New Orleans, by the publication of an extra issued from the office of the Picayune, on the afternoon of the day on which the illustrious American died. The event, which threw the greatest nation of the world into unfeigned mourning, took place at the country residence of the deceased, Marshfield, Massachusetts, at 3 o'clock, on the morning of Sunday, October 24th, 1852. The Picayune alone, received the sad news that day, by telegraph, and immediately published it, accompanied by the following message, promptly issued by the Hon. A. D. Crossman, Mayor of this city.

MAYORALTY of NEW ORLEANS,
October 24,1852.

The American people are again bowed down in grief for the loss of one of their greatest and most patriotic statesmen. DANIEL WEBSTER, whose matchless intellect towered above all his compeers is no more. Of that mighty trio--CLAY, CALHOUN and WEBSTER--each one of whom devoted a lifetime to his country's cause, and whose dying breath was yielded up in the service of a grateful and admiring, but now, alas, afflicted people, the last has been gathered to the tomb Of his fathers. But a few short months since, the nation was called upon to mourn the loss of HENRY CLAY, and now again the funeral pall is spread over the land at the announcement of the death of DANIEL WEBSTER.

And while a nation's tears are flowing at this national bereavement, it is fitting that we should display the outward simbols of woe, as an evidence-feeble and inadequate though the expression may be--of the affection, esteem, admiration and reverence in which the lamented deceased was held in this community. For DANIEL WEBSTER, though calling himself a citizen of Massachusetts, was emphatically a national man in the broadest sense of the term.

Therefore, I, A. D. Crossman, Mayor of the City of New Orleans, do issue this my proclamation, recommending to my follow-citizens as a token of respect for the departed statesman, to abstain from their ordinary business associations on Monday next, the 25th inst. I also recommend that the flags be displayed during the day at half-mast from the various public buildings, and from vessels and steamboats in port, and that minute guns be fired from sunrise to sunset, the commanding officers being authorized to carry this order into execution.

It is expected that the various offices of the City Government, as well as all other public offices, be closed after 12 o'clock, on that day.

(Signed) A. D. CROSSMAN, Mayor.

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