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HENRY CLAY.

those of his opponents who flouted the Government on being unprepared for war."

His great object was finally accomplished. War was declared. The military and naval resources of the country were called into requisition, and both on the land and on the ocean, the honor of the country was gloriously sustained.

In consequence of the friendly interposition of the Emperor Alexander of Russia, a willingness was expressed by the Ministry of England to negotiate with our Government a treaty of peace. Mr. CLAY and Mr. Russell were appointed by Mr. Madison, Commissioners for this purpose, and accordingly Mr. CLAY on the 19th of January, 1814, resigned his station as Speaker of the House of Representatives, and proceeded on his mission to Ghent. He was there joined by Messrs. Adams, Gallatin. and Bayard, who bad left St. Petersburg and repaired to the place appointed for the meeting of the Commissioners, for the purpose of aiding in the arrangement of the terms of peace. The, treaty was signed in December, 1814. Afterwards a commercial convention, highly advantageous to the trade and navigation of the country, was concluded in London, by three of the Commissioners of Ghent, viz: Messrs. Adams, CLAY and Gallatin.

The public career of Mr. CLAY was subsequently distinguished by the able, eloquent, and untiring support be gave to the cause of Internal Improvement, and to the protection of Domestic Industry. Let the mere sectional politician say what he may, these great measures were absolutely necessary, to enable the country to develop with rapidity her great natural resources, and to secure her independence of the manufactories of Europe. Those who would properly appreciate the services of Mr. CLAY, must look to the situation of the country while she was yet young and in a comparatively feeble state; and not to her present prosperous position, with her great facilities for international communication, and for prompt and rapid transportation from State to State; nor to her splendid manufactories, which are soon destined not only to rival, but to surpass establishments of the same character in the Old World. Nor should we limit our enquiry to the condition of the country in time of peace; but we should view the subject as the great Statesman himself was accustomed to view it, with reference to

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