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negotiated while at the head of the Department of State, was greater than all that had been previously concluded there, from the adoption of the Constitution.* He concluded and signed treaties with Colombia and Central America, with Denmark, Prussia and the Hanseatic League. He also effected a negotiation with Russia for the settlement of the claims of American citizens, and concluded a treaty with Austria, but left the Department before it was signed. His letters to Mr. Gallatin, while the latter was our Minister at London, upon the subject of our trade with the British colonies, and the navigation of the St. Lawrence, have ever been regarded as documents of rare value in the history of our negotiations, and have deservedly placed the writer among the most accomplished diplomatists of the age. Another State paper, which has probably gained him more reputation than all others which have emanated from his pen, is his letter of instructions to the Delegation to the Congress of Panama. But that which will in all time secure to his memory the veneration of every ardent lover of liberty, is his successful appeal to the Emperor of Russia, through our Minister at St. Petersburg, (Mr. Middleton), to contribute his exertions towards terminating the war which was then raging between Spain and her South American colonies. He was equally successful in obtaining the acquiescence of the same great power in the recognition of the independence of Greece. His strenuous exertions while he was Secretary of State, in connection with the noble efforts previously made by himself and Mr. WEBSTER, upon the proposition of the latter to send a commissioner to Greece, were mainly instrumental in exciting the sympathies of Europe in favor of the struggling people of that ancient home of freedom; and in securing to them a recognition of those constitutional guaranties for the protection of their rights under a limited monarchy, for which they had long contended. And now, in the musical strains of Whittier:

The Grecian as he feeds his flocks
In Tempe's vale, on Morea's rocks,
Or where the gleam of bright blue waters
Is caught by Scio's white armed daughters,
While dwelling on the dubious strife
Which ushered in his nation's life,
Shall mingle in his grateful way
Bozzaris with the name Of CLAY.

*Life of Mr. CLAY by Eppes Sargent.


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