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EULOGY ON

politician; it is the most difficult of all, to rise to the dignity and independence of a statesman. With the former the primary object is victory; and it is a matter of minor importance what principle may be sacrificed in obtaining it. To the latter victory brings no laurels, but when it heralds the triumph of principle. How few, how very few are willing to withhold from party what is due to their country. How many think of their country only when the triumph of party has been secured. No man struggled more manfully for the success of his party than Mr. CLAY; but how easily could he surrender it and sacrifice it, and every thing that appertained to it, and even himself, whenever it became necessary to protect the Union, or to ward off a blow which political assassins were aiming at the Constitution. For such an occasion, come when it might, the great Patriot was always ready, and always equal to the demands of his country. It was then that be knew no friends, no party, but the friends and the party who were arrayed in defence of the Constitution and the Union. It was then, that

"Among the mightiest, bent on highest deeds,"

we found him always prepared to act under the influence of those "sublime emotions of a patriotism, which soaring towards heaven, rises far above all mean, low and selfish things, and is absorbed by one soul-transporting thought of the good and the glory of one's country; that patriotism, which catching its inspirations from the immortal God, and leaving at an immeasurable distance below all lesser, grovelling, personal interests and feelings, animates and prompts to deeds of self-sacrifice, of valor, of devotion, and of death itself."* It was then, fellow-citizens, that he "WOULD RATHER BE RIGHT, THAN TO BE PRESIDENT." It was then, that official power, however acceptable otherwise to a generous ambition, however gratifying to the pride of an old soldier of a hundred battles, as an evidence of his country's confidence, and as a forerunner of an honorable discharge, lost all its charms, and sank into utter insignificance. For what allurements had power however exalted, for the generous, high-souled patriot, when it could no longer be associated with the honor, the greatness and glory of his country?

*Mr. CLAY's Speech on the Veto Power


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