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EULOGY ON

that great orator exclaimed: "What would have been your applause could you have heard it from Demosthenes himself?" Those who heard, can surely never forget, the peroration of Mr. CLAY's speech in the Senate of the United States on the Expunging Resolutions. He flamed in his lofty attitude of defiance like a burning seraph, while every bolt which he hurled amid peals of thunder upon his opponents, seemed

"bright
With an immortal's vengeance."

The sword of his indignation like that

"Of Michael from the armory of God,
Was given him tempered so, that neither keen
Nor solid, might resist that edge."

The character of Mr. CLAY will serve as a pattern of intellectual and moral excellence worthy of the imitation of all who may aspire to public honors--the mirror before which they may array themselves for the conflicts of public life. His untarnished honor, his lofty pride, his dauntless courage, his never failing self-reliance, his deep sense of moral obligation, his incorruptible integrity, his "delicate sensibilities exalted into sublime virtues," his magic eloquence and comprehensive wisdom, all so harmoniously blended, contributed to form an American, to whom all Americans in all coming time may turn with admiration and gratitude.

England in the reign of her good Queen Anne, was wont to point to her Bolingbroke, as the "Beacon of English Statesmen." If great sagacity, the most untiring physical energy, great mental endowments, combined with irresistible eloquence, could justify his claims to the enviable title, posterity may never withhold it. But where in his character, as history has portrayed it, do we find those great moral qualities which preeminently distinguished the public career of our American Orator and Patriot?--qualities which will enable the countrymen of the latter to point to his glorious example, as a Pharos to the statesmen of the world.

In forming its estimate of human greatness, the mind is ever inclined to resort to comparisons. In fixing the rank or position of a truly great man, in modern times, we naturally recur to the past, in


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