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EULOGY ON

Rome against the robberies and cruelties committed by the proconsul of Africa. With the former, be would have arraigned before the justice of the world every act of oppression, whether it emanated from a commander at the head of his conquering legions, or resulted from the execution of the mandates of imperial power. If he could have been thrown in the midst of modern revolutions, who does not feel that his eloquence would have animated, his courage have confirmed, his wisdom have guided the devoted apostles of Truth. He would have added strength to the energies of the boldest, and imparted a more glowing zeal to their efforts in the cause of civil and religious freedom; and all the edicts that ever emanated from the indignation of thrones, would never have arrested him in the prosecution of his purpose; all the thunders that were ever forged in the furnaces of despotism would never have silenced his counter thunders, until "the banner of Liberty was abroad upon the mountains in its first loveliness, and the assaults of tyranny could no longer prevail against it." With John Hampden, be would have resisted step by step every attempt to subvert the rights of the citizen, every encroachment upon the privileges of Parliament; and with him he would have charged the squadrons of the fiery Rupert. Contemplate him in imagination, amid the storms of the American Revolution--not as be really was, an infant Hercules in his cradle,--but in the full possession of those intellectual and moral energies which in the maturity of manhood lie displayed; and who does not believe that he would have stood in the van with the noblest of the champions of Independence, and have "felt the great arm of Washington lean on him for support." In any age of the world, the great abilities and high personal qualities of our departed patriot, would have rendered him illustrious, and equal to the exigencies of any cause his generous soul would have prompted him to espouse.

Although, fellow-citizens, it was the lot Of Mr. CLAY never to reach the summit of his ambition; although he was never called by his countrymen to fill the highest political station within their gift, what generous and enlightened mind within the whole range of the Republic, can feel that mere official power or authority, however elevated, could add one cubit to the statue of his great fame? Do we not find in


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